Tips for Mosquito and Tick Prevention and Protection

I adore the outdoors. The warmer weather really suits my family and I. I often find myself taking hikes in the woods with my husband and our 8-year-old boxer Rowdy. He still loves to run the hills. The boxer that is : )! Our two oldest children love to join us as well. The 3-year-old twins aren’t quite big enough, so they do not come nearly as often.

Summertime in Michigan means camping trips, fishing and bonfires… So many wonderful things to do in the summer. Unfortunately, with the warmer weather comes the nasty bugs. Image result for tickAs much time as our family spends in the woods I am always worried about ticks.

 

With tick born illnesses on the rise I try to stay prepared. I am always sure to carry my Tick Key Tick Remover with me.  I feel much safer knowing this device will remove not only the body of the tick, but it's head as well.  This great feature cuts down on the risk of my family contracting tick born illnesses. 

Ticks are all over the united states spreading Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Ehrlichiosis, etc. Its flat construction makes it convenient to carry right in my pocket. I also make sure to keep one on Rowdy’s leash, because it is just as effective for tick removal on pets. 

 

If ticks weren't bad enough, we live in Michigan near the seemingly endless bodies of water and the Mosquitoes here are voracious breeders and feeders.

Mosquitoes are not only very annoying, but they spread Image result for mosquitodiseases such as West Nile Virus, malaria and dengue fever among others. There are 170 various kinds of Mosquitoes in North America alone. Some of the easy, but effective strategies we utilize at home to keep them away from the kids ( who are constantly outdoors in our shaded backyard ) are as follows:

Eliminate Standing Water:  Mosquitoes breed stagnant water therefore, removing or replacing any stagnant water at least once a week also removes the mosquito larvae. 

 Clean Up Debris:  Debris around the house can also harbor mosquito babies.  They are able to breed in damp soil or debris such as leaf piles or decaying logs. This also helps control Ticks in the yard!

 Keep Your Lawn Cut:  As I mentioned earlier, mosquitoes like to lay their eggs in damp soil.  By keeping the lawn cut you can allow the top layer of soil to dry out removing a potential breeding ground. This as well will help control Ticks in the yard!

 Plant A Garden:  Well.. Sort of.  Certain plants are naturally effective mosquito repellents.  Lavendar and marigolds are the two powerhouses, but plants such as citronella lemongrass, rosemary, catnip, bee balm, ageratum, peppermint, basil, and sage also pack a powerful punch.

 Coffee To The Rescue!:  Is there anything this fantastic beverage can't do?  Sprinkle your coffee grounds over damp areas and standing water.  Coffee grounds are an all natural, effective control against mosquito larvae.  The grounds mixed with the water create a mixture that kills the mosquito larvae. (1)

 

For those of you that are active and love to be outdoors like my family and I, a mosquito repellent is a great line of defense! I prefer not to spray my children or myself with harmful chemicals like deet. I am not sold on the safety of deet sprays, not to mention the smell. Thankfully I found an all natural, highly effective answer. The Super-band mosquito repelling band.  So I gave bug bands a shot, and boy do I love them! These bands are an all natural, nontoxic and deet free bracelet worn on the wrist or ankle!  They are sold in 3 designs.  A Classic Super-band which is a yellow bracelet which my husband and I wear, or for our more stylish children, Marvel Avengers as well as Mickey & Minnie charm bracelets. All I have to do is remove them from their resealable pouch and slide them on our wrists and away we go. Even our boxer rowdy enjoys the mosquito prevention the Super-bands provide.  They are great for pets too!

Let me know what you use to keep your family protected in the outdoors from summers nasty bugs!

 

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4436121/

 


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